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Gems of Telugu Poetry – ‘chaaTuvu’ (4)

It may not be an over statement if it is said that there will not be many among the Telugu speaking people who have no knowledge of the following ‘chaaTu’ poem, which is also in ‘kanda’ meter. The authorship for this poem also is not known:

vaMkaaya  vaMTi  kuurayu
paMkajamukhi  siita  vaMTi  bhaamaamaNiyun
SaMkaruni  vaMTi  daivamu
laMkaadhipu  vairivaMTi  raajunu  galaDea?

వంకాయ వంటి కూరయు
పంకజముఖి సీత వంటి భామామణియున్
శంకరుని వంటి దైవము
లంకాధిపు వైరివంటి రాజును గలడే?   (in Telugu font)

A curry like the one made of brinjal(1)
A precious woman like the lotus-faced Sita(2)
A God like the Lord Siva(3),
A king like the enemy of the lord of Lanka(4) do ever exist?

 Notes: (1) A vegetable, the scientific name of which is Solanum melongena. The telugu word ‘kuura’ has two meanings – (i) a curry prepared using a vegetable (ii) a vegetable.  The former meaning has been taken here since it appeared more relevant.  This vegetable popularly known as ‘brinjal’ is the one vegetable, which is available and used to prepare a variety of curries through out India. (2) The divine consort of Lord Sri Rama. Though She had the option of remaining in Ayodhya (since it was only Lord Sri Rama’s exile for a period of 13 years, Kaikeyi, the third queen of king Dasaratha, wanted and got as a boon from him) willingly She followed Lord Sri Rama to the jungle and spent all the 13 years with Him in the jungle.  She is known and revered for her piety and She is the role model for any house-wife in India. (3) Lord Siva is known to be a favorite God to many since he is the one God who can be pleased very easily and get whatever one wanted as a boon from him (4) Reference here is to Lord Sri Rama (and not Ravana).  The period of his reign is known as ‘Rama Rajya’, a period during which ‘Dharma’ (there is no equivalent word in English language that can convey the complete meaning of this Sanskrit word ‘Dharma’) is said to have walked on all its four feet, as per Hindu mythology.

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